Friends’ Bookstore BOOKSALE


TOMORROW: BOOKSALE!!
Thursdays on First and Third comes to Second Street!!

Thursday, July 1 3:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Buy 2 get 1 free
of equal or lesser value

Art books
Coffeetable books
Oversize Non-fiction
Exhibit format books

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Beach Reads Contest!

The next contest is Beach Reads.
Submit a photo of your favorite beach book. Photo can include your favorite beach location, pals, and/or treats! Include a caption or short commentary on what makes this a good beach read. This is a great opportunity to be creative! The best entry will win a book of your choice from our prize bookshelf. Entries must be submitted by July 14, 2010. Beach reads are for sale in the Friends’ Bookstore, during the month of June and July. And they will be having a special beach read book sale on July 10!
Official contest rules.

How to Read a Book Mortimer Adler Charles Van Doren


I have a number of Reading Guides from various stages of life. This one is subtitled – the classic guide to intelligent reading. 1940, renvewed 1967. It turns out it is on a summer reading list for one of the local highschools. I discovered this via a text message from a daughter to a friend who was trying to buy the book online all day, and missed the deadline by taking the dog for a walk. They said the title, I said by Adler? I have a copy…. My husband said SOLD (e.g. one more book OUT of the house!).
I felt this book was pretty much common sense – leaving through it again I realise I normally do these things. The Art of Reading… How to make reading a habit. Inspectional reading. The essence of active reading (four basic questions: 1) what is the book about? 2) what is being said in detail? 3)Is the book true (in whole or part)4)what of it? (in the chapter how to be a demanding reader – yup, that’s me!} Analytical Reading. Which is more relevant now as it relates to the author, to fairness, to reasoning/thinking about the book, the subject, the author.
There is a section on the approaches of different kinds of reading matter – as you should read history different from stories, different from poems, different from practical books, different from science/mathematics or philosophy. There is of cousre a suggested reading list and ‘what good books can do for us’.
I had forgotten the chapter on Syntopical Reading (especially as it is the ‘ultimate goal’ – reading several books on the same subject/topic. Of course it is not easy to determine what is considered the same topic! And I tend to forget people don’t read alot of books (the recent example of Stieg Larson, where it was supposed to be such new and original work, but honestly, haven’t you read that ending 100 times?) ….
I have to relate that it was THIS book, that started me reading Thucydides, The history of the Peloponnesian War – as it is on their recommended reading list. From High School through University, I attempted to read this list. Yes, during the summer, when everyone else was reading Beach reads! I will never forget the faces when asked what I was reading (and obviously enjoying). Looking through the list, there are still afew things I need to find (The Song of Roland, 12th century; Persian Letters, Gottfried Wilhel van Leibniz Discourse on Metaphysics (perhaps not)- I still haven’t read Henri Bergson or John Dewey or Alfred North Whitehead….
I finally read ‘about’ Adam Smith – Wealth of Nations because of PJ O’Rourke’s distillation).
It has obviously been a good 30+ years of reading this list though – I am astonished at the memories that each title brings back.
Happy Reading!

Art Walk, Second Saturday BOOK SALES


Save the Dates:
Art Walk is going to be this Thursday the first July in the Bookstore. From 3pm to 7pm we will have a display of Art Walk books for sale, as well as other materials. August 5th will be our next Art Walk Sale!
Second Saturday
July 10th will be our next Bookstore Second Saturday Sale. Check details next week as we are sorting out the specials!

Joshua Ferris

With the publication of his second novel The Unnamed (2010) I noticed the reviews in the New Yorker, and advertisements all over. I had missed his first novel: Then we came to the End, which won the Hemmingway Foundation/PEN award and the Barnes and Nobel Discover Award. It was also a National Book Award finalist. He also writes for the New Yorker, living in NY. SO, both books were taken out of the Library, and provided extremely thoughtful ‘chews’. They require thinking as you read, and much more thought to digest/assimilate. There is so much I just can’t understand or relate to, yet it is so vivid you think ‘it must be real’. Corporate life, family, lawyer, having it all, to vagrant. The writing is astonishing, the story progression unusual. Neither is an easy read, but they are unforgetable.

Richard Yancey The Highly Effective Detective.

If you are looking for something slightly different to read, this one came recommended to me by Elizabeth (via Carol). As she said, it did take me awhile to get into it, e.g. put up with the bumbling characters, but it was fun. It should make for an enjoyable summer read too. Teddy Ruzak begins his first case, a hit and run killing of a gaggle of goslings. This is a debut series novel, so if it suits you there will be more! Many people who like Donald E Westlake’s novels like this.
I had previously read Something Missing by Matthew Dick, which was more hilarious, about a thief, so that might be why this one didn’t sizzle for me (but it didn’t fizzle either, just seemed a bit unlikely! One more bumbling detective.).