Hot reads for cold nights

I never know what I am going to read next. Somehow this week I have had five rather varied nonfiction books catch my eye. A purchased ebook to give me organized quotes from highlighting the environmental message of Peter Wadham’s A Farewell to Ice. Two library books were most enjoyed: a) The New Wine Rules (2017) by Jon Bonne has fun Rules from 1) drink the rainbow to 89) don’t save a great bottle for anything more than a rainy day. Open and enjoy. And b) The Flora of Middle-Earth (2017) by the father son team Walter and Graham Judd. Walter is an eminent professor of Botany at UFlorida and his son Graham is a professional illustrator in St Paul Mn. They spent four years exhaustively researching the plants and created an amazing field guide so you can create your own middle earth. I can’t believe I missed the NPR review of this. Two additional books were sent by friends 1) Deep Nutrition by Catherine Shananhan, MD- so much common sense that really means changing your lifestyle and 2) Forged in Crisis by Nancy Koehn, PhD Historian.

Title: Forged in Crisis by Nancy Koehn

Publisher: Scribner, 2017, 517 pp

Genre: history, leadership, crisis management

4 stars, Recommended as Library reading, I’m glad I didn’t pay money.

Author: From her bio

“Nancy Koehn is a historian at the Harvard Business School where she holds the James E. Robinson chair of Business Administration. She has coached leaders from many organizations and speaks frequently at the World Economic Forum in Davos, the Aspen Ideas Festival, and the World Business Forum. An accomplished author and scholar (she earned her M.A. and PhD degrees in history from Harvard), she spent ten years writing Forged in Crisis, her first book aimed at a popular audience. Her research focuses on how leaders, past and present, craft lives of purpose, worth and impact. She lives in Concord, Massachusetts and is a committed equestrian.” She has written several books and case studies, previous best: Brand New: How Entrepreneurs Earned Consumers’ Trust from Wedgewood To Dell about six entrepreneurs.

Story:

The case studies or essays include Ernest Shackleton, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Rachel Carson. This was an interesting mix and my first question was why these five, what did they have in common? I’ve read multiple great biographies on all but Bonhoeffer. At the same time, the current political climate could benefit from a wider audience reading this book.

I was disappointed in the analysis of leadership, often a page summarizing at the end of each profile (60-80 pages). They more like afterthoughts not original insight. In the conclusion, “The Power of Courageous Leadership” Koehn tells us that the most important thing that connects these leaders is “that these leaders were made, not born.” Years ago, I read John F. Kennedy’s succinct, inspirational book, “Profiles in Courage.” I can’t believe it’s too dated to read. Especially in light of the comment/conclusion “All five leaders were willing to work on themselves.” I think college lecture or motivational speaker. “The second thing that each of the five leaders learned as they navigated through great turbulence was the significance of committing to a worthy goal.” This applies to every generation, but we need tools to make the generations work together. These five also learned was the value of resilience. We definitely need more of that.

Quote:

From the introduction, leaders are “effective, decent…people of purpose and commitment who want to make a positive difference and who choose to rise: first within themselves, by claiming their better selves, and then on the large stage, by staking out the higher ground.”

Advertisements

Travel Books

img_3979February is book lovers month

Travel always brings extra reading with plane time, airport delays, bookshop perusal and friends recommendations.

As quick ebook reads I started the Iris and Roy Johansen’s Kendra Michaels series. Kendra had her sight restored through stem cell technology as a young woman and now uses all her senses to help the FBI solve difficult murder cases. Today I discovered there is a new one in the series! The suspense kept me occupied for a day of flight delays. I love the ease of downloading Library ebooks. At any one time I have 5-7books waiting to be read, as well as a long hold list or current and popular titles.

An absolutely fantastic charming read was recommended by an RPL librarian. The Unexpected Inheritance Of Inspector Chopra, written by Vaseem Khan is the Alexander McCall Smith of India. It is also the first of three novels published (so far) and I have to find the other two. You are in for the funny, poignant, insightful tale of Chopra retiring from the police force but determined to solve one last case. I can’t wait to find out what happens with the baby elephant, a most unusual retirement gift.

Three Queens in Erin by Douglas Nicholas. RPL has this fantasy series, where few do; it it is one of the best! Read on if you like Patrick Rothfuss, Dave Duncan or GRRMartin. I was delighted to find the latest and last installment by this award winning poet. Magic exists but all the stories are based on actual British history. There are several plot lines that develop through the series, coming of age of Hob (to Robert the Englishman), good vs evil with magical shape shifting or witchcraft, clan allegiance and reestablishing matriarch lineage in medieval times. They must be read in order for full appreciation of the trials of Queen Maeve and the historical perspective. I loved every novel and the satisfactory sense of completion at the end of Three Queens.

Flavia is back!! I love all the Flavia deLuce books in Alan Bradley’s charming YA series. The Grave is a Fine and Private Place is the 10th installment in the award winning author’s preteen English sleuth. She has had so many maturing changes, but is back in Buckshaw in familiar territory: there’s another body, her trusted friends surround her and the celebrated wit and observations are to the fore. It’s not the best book in the series, I’d read them in order to appreciate this more. But it is a delightful read nonetheless.

Book Group in a Bag

Our book group met today, using Zoom, as we couldn’t get out of our icy driveways. We all wanted to discuss this month’s amazing selection Homegoing and didn’t want to delay meeting. A friend has been to the slave castle (Cape Coast) in Ghana recently and provided a few photographs (thanks to Joe Lobl for including them). This book is available as a book group In a bag from RPL, but there is a reserve line. Ditto hardcopy and ebook. Sign up now!

Title: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Publisher: Knopf 2016 vintage reprint May 2017 320 pp

Highly recommended, rounded up to five stars

Author:

Gyasi is 26 year old and was born in Ghana. Her family moved to the USA when she was two when her father was completing his PhD at Ohio State. As an immigrant child “books were her closest friends”. She studied English literature, BA Stanford, MFA University Of Iowa. Homecoming was inspired by her first (2009) trip to Ghana and is her debut novel. The title is from an African belief that death allowed an enslaved persons spirit to travel back home to Africa.

National Book Critic Circle award for best first book

Winner of the PEN/ Hemingway Award

Winner of the NBCC’s John Leonard Award

A New York Times Notable Book

A Washington Post Notable Book

2017 Granta Best Of Young American Novelists

One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, Time, Oprah.com, Harper’s Bazaar, San Francisco Chronicle, Mother Jones, Esquire, Elle, Paste, Entertainment Weekly, the Skimm, PopSugar, Minneapolis Star Tribune, BuzzFeed, The Guardian, Financial Times

Story:

(Excerpt from book plate) “Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery.

Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi’s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.”

Bookgroup comments:

1)The genealogy page is very important to keep the characters straight, but it was also noted that these stories were interchangeable with many African American families.

2)This is not the usual book you read from the Iowa Writing School. Loved the originality of it.

3)It was a dark book, not necessarily one I would have chosen to read. But we learned so many different things from it. Importantly the author wanted you to understand racial tension in America by the time you got to the end.

4)I became invested in the characters and wished to know so much more about them, instead of the short chapters they were restricted to.

5)Surprise at some of the literary criticism (our balanced book reporting), as we thought the writing was exceptional. She is working on her next book too.

Weekend Reading

6 books leapt into my hands during a quick trip into the Library. Yes, all in the New Section when you walk in. And mostly new to me authors.

Both the title and the cover attracted me to this book : A Strange Scottish Shore by Juliana Gray (the third book of the series, so now I have to read the other two!). Edwardian time travel back to 1300 Orkney with Scottish myths. Then I discovered that this is a pseudonym for Beatriz Williams, whose books I discovered in December, and proceeded to devour as great escapism.

A Hunter in Winter by Conor Brady A Joe Swallow mystery. This is the third in a series, set in Ireland 1888. Wonderful evocative writing with fascinating characters and political intrigue. Great quote:“All for the empire upon which the sun will never set….Because God couldn’t trust the English for what they’d likely do in the dark.”

Gin and Panic by Maia Chance was a delightful romp during prohibition NYC. This is also the third in the Discreet Retrieval Agency Mysteries. The author is writing her PhD dissertation on nineteenth century American literature.

And perhaps the most timely is Lockdown by Laurie R. King. I highly recommend ALL her books and was disappointed that this book wasn’t more popular. It’s a hard, difficult US subject, a high school lockdown, but King is an amazing detailed writer of psychological suspense.

Will finish the other two tomorrow or Monday of the long holiday weekend.

Happy reading!

(They will be returned Tuesday if you want to check them out!)

February chills

February is The month of Book Love

I am still reading a lot of escapism now in the wake of the current government. January devoured 50 books in fiction and non fiction. Mysteries are great fun, especially by known authors. I have many favourites and always look for their new releases. I have always been a fan of Thomas Perry and have recommended his books since his debut Edgar award winning novel The Butcher’s Boy (1982). Metzer’s Dog followed and then I loved the Jane Whitefield series. I have recommended several of his later mysteries on this blog. I am just delighted to report that his latest novel is fantastic. The read is a satisfying, gripping tale straight through.

Title: The Bombmaker, by Thomas Perry

Publisher: Mysterious Press, Grove Jan 2018 384 pp

Genre: thriller, suspense, mystery,

Highly recommended, Rounded up to 5 stars

Author:

Thomas Perry’s work has covered a variety of fictional suspense from The Butcher’s Boy, Metzger’s Dog, Big Fish to Island and Sleeping Dogs. His critically acclaimed Jane Whitefield series includes: Vanishing Act (chosen as one of the “100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century” by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association), Dance for the Dead, Shadow Woman, The Face Changers, Blood Money, Runner, and Poison Flower. The New York Times selected Nightlife for its best seller selection. Perry developed a non-series list of mysteries with Death Benefits, Pursuit (which won a Gumshoe Award in 2002), Dead Aim, Night Life, Fidelity, and Strip. In The Informant, released in 2011, Perry brought back the hit-man character first introduced in The Butcher’s Boy and later the protagonist in Sleeping Dogs. He has continued the best selling individual mysteries with Forty Thieves (2016), The Old Man h2017) and his current novel The Bomb Maker.

Perry received a B.A. from Cornell University in 1969 and his Ph.D. in English Literature. In addition to writing he is a television writer and producer (Simon & Simon, 21 Jump Street, Star Trek: The Next Generation). Perry has written 25 mystery/thriller novels, never the same book twice. His website is http://www.thomasperryauthor.com

Story:

This is an action packed, dangerous battle of wits in the City of Angels. In many ways this is very much a book of our times. We have a nameless villain, unknown terrorists, poor gun control (how easy was it to purchase dozens of machine guns??), political infighting, and unnecessary romance (although with the me too movement she initiated the relationship. I actually thought it it was more of an affirmation of being alive in this uncertain world). Perry is a brilliant suspense writer, with amazing meticulous technical research (yes, more than you ever wanted to know about bomb making). But the detail is essential to the complexity of both the characters and the frightening times we live in.

Was there ever any doubt that there would be an explosive ending?

The Rochester Public library has a hardcopy as well as ebook editions. They also have many of the newer books as ebooks.