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AVAILABLE TODAY: THE EDGE OF NOWHERE

IN BOOKSTORES AND ONLINE TODAY!

FULL RESOLUTION EON

SYNOPSIS

The year is 1992 and Victoria Hastings Harrison Greene—reviled matriarch of a sprawling family—is dying.

After surviving the Oklahoma Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, Victoria refuses to leave this earth before revealing the secrets she’s carried for decades.

Once the child of a loving family during peaceful times, a shocking death shattered her life. Victoria came face to face with the harshness of the world. As the warm days of childhood receded to distant memory, Victoria learns to survive.

No matter what it takes.

To keep her family alive in an Oklahoma blighted by dust storms and poverty, Victoria makes choices—harsh ones, desperate ones. Ones that eventually made her into the woman her grandchildren fear and whisper about. Ones that kept them all alive. Hers is a tale of tragedy, love, murder, and above all, the conviction to never stop fighting.


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

bloggingC.H. Armstrong is an Oklahoma native transplanted in Minnesota. A 1992 graduate of the University of Oklahoma, “Cathie”is a life-long lover of books, and staunchly outspoken on subject of banned and challenged books. The Edge of Nowhere is her first novel and was inspired by her own family’s experiences during the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl and The Great Depression.


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Pre-Orders Open for Novel by Local Author

Rochester author, C.H. Armstrong, has recently penned her first novel, The Edge of Nowhere.  This novel has been picked up by California-based publishing house, Penner Publishing, and is set for a January 19, 2016 release.  Recently on her website, she posted information about this novel and its origins.

Armstrong, a native of Oklahoma and 23-year resident of Rochester, grew up on the stories of her familys’ survival during the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl and has centered her novel around this theme.  Below is a reprint from the author’s website telling more about this novel, the background, a little about the history, and the people who inspired the novel.  We reprint it here on our blog by permission of the author. Enjoy!


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FROM THE BACK COVER

The year is 1992 and Victoria Hastings Harrison Greene—reviled matriarch of a sprawling family—is dying.

After surviving the Oklahoma Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, Victoria refuses to leave this earth before revealing the secrets she’s carried for decades.

Once the child of a loving family during peaceful times, a shocking death shattered her life. Victoria came face to face with the harshness of the world. As the warm days of childhood receded to distant memory, Victoria learns to survive.

No matter what it takes.

To keep her family alive in an Oklahoma blighted by dust storms and poverty, Victoria makes choices—harsh ones, desperate ones. Ones that eventually made her into the woman her grandchildren fear and whisper about. Ones that kept them all alive. Hers is a tale of tragedy, love, murder, and above all, the conviction to never stop fighting.


 

AUTHOR’S SYNOPSIS

Victoria Hastings Harrison Greene knows her family despises her.  She’s even heard her grandchildren snigger behind her back about the “Immaculate Conception of David” – her fifth child, conceived between husbands.  But Victoria refuses to die before revealing the secrets she’s held locked away for more than 50 years; the secrets only whispered about in family folklore that have made her the feared matriarch of her family.

Widowed with nine children, Victoria will do anything to provide for her children – even murder, and without remorse.  Each day brings greater challenges:  poverty, homelessness, death, starvation, degradation and disease.  Some challenges will require despicable acts to overcome. But at what cost?  Can her family understand the decisions she’s made to secure their futures?


 

THE REAL STORY BEHIND THE NOVEL

The Edge of Nowhere is a work of historical fiction inspired by the experiences of my own grandmother during the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl and the Great Depression.  While it is a complete work of fiction, many of the stories contained within its pages are based upon anecdotes that have been passed down from my father’s generation, through mine, and down to my children.  Several of the key factors of the book are taken from their actual experiences, and others are the product of my imagination or exaggeration.  As a reader, you’ll have to decide which is which.  The answers may surprise you.

Four of my grandparents' combined fourteen children.  These four were their first together.  Not pictured are the five he brought to the marriage, and the five that came after this photo was taken. Front Row:  Bill and Geraldine Second Row:  Shirley and Ed (My Daddy)Four of my grandparents’ combined fourteen children. These four were their first together. Not pictured are the five he brought to the marriage, and the five that came after this photo was taken. Front Row: Bill and Geraldine / Back Row: Shirley and Ed (My Daddy). For readers of the book, these four children inspired the characters of Jack, Grace, Sara and Ethan.

The Dust Bowl that swept through Oklahoma and neighboring states was arguably the most devastating natural disaster to ever hit American soil.  Unlike a tornado, earthquake or a hurricane, the Dust Bowl lasted nearly ten straight years.  What was once beautiful green prairie and farmland of wheat fields as far as the eye can see soon became nothing but dust and dirt.  A desert of sorts.  Everywhere you looked was blowing dirt.  It got into your mouth and ears.  You couldn’t help but to inhale it deep into your lungs until you choked.  Many during this time died of what came to be known as “dust pneumonia.”  It was relentless and brutal.

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Photo Credit Dorthea Lange

Farming was the lifeblood of most Oklahomans during this time, but the soil had become so eroded that nothing would grow.  If your livelihood is farming and nothing will grow, what do you do?  How do you live?  These are the questions I began asking myself as Victoria’s story unfolded. How do you provide for your family when you’re a single woman alone with nearly a dozen children and no resources?

An important thing to remember about Oklahomans of this era is that most had no formal education.  They knew one thing:  farming.  If you’ve read Steinbeck’s epic novel, The Grapes of Wrath, then you know that many of these people moved West for a better life.  Most people were too poor to move, however, and so they stayed behind and hoped for better days.  The Edge of Nowhere is the story of those people.  It’s the story of the true Oklahoma Spirit — the dogged determination and tenacity that continues to see them through continued disasters like the Oklahoma City Bombing and the yearly tornados that destroy home and property.  It is the story of a people dedicated to the land they love and the place they call home.  An interesting side note is that many of these same families who stayed behind and endured the harsh life of The Dust Bowl are still there today.  The same lands that once had forsaken them are now being farmed by their children and grandchildren.

“Abandoned farmstead in the Dust Bowl region of Oklahoma, showing the effects of wind erosion, 1937”
Image Source: http://www.britannica.com/media/full/174462/96105

My grandmother - Edna Hall Hedrick Golden - in her later years.

My grandmother – Edna Hall Hedrick Golden – in later years.

During this era, my grandmother was left a widow with her husband’s five nearly grown children and an additional seven smaller ones for a grand total of twelve children (she would go on to remarry after this era and have two more children for a combined fourteen).  She was only 28 years old.  Soon thereafter, she lost their farm and she found herself homeless, hungry and with few resources.  She had no family to speak of, so providing and caring for these children fell entirely to her.  I don’t know what she was like before my grandfather’s death, but I know that in the years I knew her she was strong and opinionated.  She ruled her children with an iron fist and they respected her for it.  She was a legend and not many people would dare to cross her path.

So sets the stage for The Edge of Nowhere.  You have a young woman, widowed, with a combined twelve children.  You have no resources.  You’ve lost your home, your children are hungry, jobs are scarce, what do you do?  Maybe a better question is this:  What wouldn’t you do to provide for your children?  And how do the decisions you’re forced to make change the person you are?

This book is currently under contract with Penner Publishing with an expected publication date of January 2016.  While you wait, take some time to visit the PBS website dedicated to the Dust Bowl.  You can find that link here.

The Edge of Nowhere is available for pre-order in e-book format (paperbacks coming soon!) through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, iTunes and Kobo.  It is currently priced at a reasonable $2.99. You can preorder your e-book copy at one of the links below.

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National Library Week- celebrate reading!

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Title: A Desperate Fortune by Susanna Kearsley
Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark,
528 pp April 7, 2015
Genre: historical, mystery, Jacobite, romance, romantic suspense, scottish,
5 stars*****
Author: Susanna Kearsley is a favourite author of mine. I have reviewed several of her books, and recommended all of them. I was hooked when the first reminded me of reading Mary Stewart. Don’t miss The Rose Garden, Shadowy Horses and Mariana. But when her stories gathered Scottish mists and legends I was in thrall and this novel continues this with another magical setting. The historical details are well researched. The gothic suspense is real and building.The voice of each character is pitch perfect. Her romance is subtle and charming.
I found both stories equally heartwarming- in fact I would have enjoyed a separate full length book on each. There are interesting complements, and resonance for many cultures. I love the feel and heft of her books, and savor every word. Three times for this novel: once to melt into the story, two to read for highlighted quotes and review and another for an appreciation of the story structure and conclusion. This helped to reestablish my initial thoughts and feelings. I especially enjoyed reading Kearsley’s acknowledgements and the reasons for telling Mary’s story.
Story Line: This book stands on its own, but the richness of the time period is more fully developed in sequence with The Winter Sea and Firebird. You will enjoy brief vignettes with some of these characters in this novel. There are two distinct story lines, although no time travel is involved. Both are complex, well paced with fascinating characters. The present day story concerns Sara Thomas, with code breaking abilities, who journeys to France to decipher a diary, potentially revealing of the Jacobite cause. An author, Alistair Scott (a champion of Scotland, with history of the ordinary people) is working on a new book and needs a coded source. She has asperger’s and is wary and unsure of herself in the modern world. Her journey is an extremely touching, charming story. Asperger’s was an unusual twist but contributes to her computer and math skills, while also revealed her to be alone, lonely. Understanding Luc Saban develops a lasting relationship.
Her transcription unfolds the story of Mary Dundas, the daughter of an exiled Jacobite, living in France, 1732. She is a brave young woman (21), smart, creative and strong, who with the aid of a highland warrior High MacPherson, travel south to Rome on a perilous journey to reach the protection of the King James III Court (father to Bonnie Prince Charlie). Instead of the expected every day diary details, we are given a story with court intrigue, actual details of financial scandal, and arduous, dangerous 18th century travel as well as an interesting time capsule. Highlanders, as written by Kearsley are simply unforgettable and wonderful.
Read On:
Mary Stewart’s gothic suspense
Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series
Mark Haddon Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night (aspherger’s)
Quotes:
Opening line: My cousin didn’t try to catch the bride’s bouquet.
….history is not just the tale of the victors. It’s the tale of the privileged.
You’re like the lone Mac in an office of PCs. They’re all running windows and you’re running OS X.
Tell Alistair Scott that if he’s buying me whisky, my preference is 16 yr old Lagavulin.
My grass is green enough.
Are all men of the Highlands so unfathomable?
That was the Griogal Cridhe, a widow’s lament about seeing her husband beheaded. (not a lullaby then)
The past, Mary thought, was itself a great predator. Chasing you always behind in a tireless pursuit…
….know from experience frogs sometime stayed frogs no matter how often you kissed them.
I liked her sense of humor and her strength, and her tenacity, and her determination to let nothing keep her down. (Sara on Mary)

Many thanks to Netgalley for an advance ebook copy; I had to purchase my own!

March is national reading month!

I had a lovely extended weekend away which involved several airplanes and therefore reading opportunities with a loaded kindle. But new cities and airports are new bookstores and several new books leapt into my luggage. So in addition to required reading I had a fantastic time. AND also learned of several more books by favourite authors to be published later this year.

Title: A Love Most Dangerous by Martin Lake
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing January 2015
352pp.
Genre: historical fiction, Tudor, Henry VIII, English history,
3.5 Stars ***
Author: Martin Lake is an English author who has written several historical novels, primarily self published. It appears he writes series, his first concerned the Norman invasion of England, The Lost King: Resistance, Wasteland and Blood of Ironside (soon to be a fourth). Another concerns the Crusades: Outcasts. I had not read this author previously, so was unprepared for the abrupt ending, which of course generally signifies a sequel. Indeed, an interview states an interesting historical character, Nicholas Bourbon will participate. While I would consider these to be superficial historical fiction (there are just enough facts and interesting characters) Wikipedia is a primary reference. Modern language and behaviour are annoying (an editor would also be useful). But they are entertaining reads. Tudor fans will enjoy.
Story line:
It is 1537, Jane Seymour is Queen, but Henry’s roving eye finds another mistress. Alice Petherton (not an historical figure, but Lake later discovered the Shelton mistresses around the same time period) is a Maid of Honor to the Queen’s Court. She’s 17, innocent but determined to control her life (never to be queen, but unrealistic for the turbulent masculine time period). I found it hard to believe that men found her so irresistible or she was seemingly unaware of this (until Cromwell points it out at the end). She is a survivor though, and became a fascinating character in the course of the year (although I am still not clear on the timeline). I would continue this series, especially at the beach.
There are several side plots, and power twists, but descriptive London locations made for interesting reading. Unexpectedly, I liked Thomas Cromwell best.
This is more of a bodice ripper with more physical assault and gratuitous sex than I expected. Hilary Mantel it is not. But not every book needs to be a history lesson. And it is Henry the VIII, with graphic detail of poverty and decadence. Tudors sell.
(Just opened my Daedalus catalogue and discovered 4 page of Tudormania, evidently it sells well! But I found three to read, the Marlowe papers by Ros Barber, The Divorce of Henry VIII by Catherine Fletcher and King’s Fool by Margaret Campbell Barnes).
Read on:
He recommends reading Alison Weir and Ian Mortimer.
I recommend Hilary Mantel or Vanora Bennett.
Phillipa Gregory (The Other Boleyn Girl) and SJ Parris (Prophecy) are favorites.
Leanda de Lisle Tudor: Passion. Manipulation. Murder.
Quotes:
Opening line:
To be a servant at the Court of King Henry is to live with your heart in your mouth.

She (Anne Boleyn) took me as one of her Maids of Honor and my slow approach to the furnace began.

Read as an ARC from Netgalley

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Spring Ahead with New Books

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad books.”
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Schaffer and Annie Barrows

Mary Doria Russell Epitaph
This is a fantastic sequel to Doc, her brilliant 2011 novel about Doc Holliday. This narrative concentrates on Wyatt Earp, dissecting the legend and creating a Homeric tragedy in turbulent American history. As only she can, she unearths truths out of myths, creating an epic. Dramatic backstory, detail and aftermath of the O.K. coral. Complicated bittersweet tale of the West in 1881. 30 seconds and several lifetimes. Complex characters, moving bonds of brotherhood.
If you loved the PBS special on the Earps you will marvel at this novel. I think reading Doc first would give you a greater appreciation of this story, as well as look forward to the vignettes of Doc.
All of her books are well worth reading, and five stars. She has a PhD in Biological Anthropology and her research skills are also legendary (19 linear feet of books and source material for his book, to say nothing of recreating a trail ride).

Ian Caldwell The Fifth Gospel
This is Caldwell’s second book and is a fast paced addictive read: part murder mystery, part family saga, part legal thriller and part papal politics. It is a thought provoking, intellectual thriller, again with extraordinary research and moving human drama. Fascinating history of Eastern Orthodox and catholic religions, the shroud of Turin and the gospels as historical teachings. Excellent balance of smart characters, intricate twists, sacrifice and forgiveness.
It needed a map, the Vatican is an intricate mystery on so many levels.
A second reading is possible to rethink some of the detailed information. Recommend listening to the audio book narrated by British actor Jack Davenport.

Neil Gaiman Trigger Warnings
If it has Gaiman’s name on it, I am going to buy it in hardcover preferably, with or without a coupon. In an Indie bookstore if I can. 25 stories and poems about the dark corridors of our imaginations. Most of these have been printed elsewhere: I strongly urge you to get your hands on the illustrated book version of The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains (2010). When I reviewed A Study in Sherlock (2011) I highlighted The Case of Death and Honey as one of the best. It is fantastic to have them collected here, as several were hard to track down. Do not read in one sitting.
(NB The Truth is a Black Cave is exceptionally read by Euan Morton in Stories by Neil Gaiman (2010) RPL has the audio book! I loved the audio book read by Gaiman himself, but first at the Sydney Opera House. BUT Morton’s Scottish voice is absolutely perfect for this Skye folktale. Yes, I have read this four times. Once when published, again when Eddie Campbell illustrated, once listening to Gaiman, and last night listening to Morton.)

Sarah Jio The Look Of Love (2014)
I am not sure how I missed this as I have read all of her novels. This is slight deviation from her usual style, but was a rewarding, enchanting read, once again in modern Seattle. It is an unusual fantasy with interesting characters and journeys we all make with love. The story reveals six types of love found in the family and friends of Jane Williams, who isn’t sure she’d recognize any. Pragma, Agape, Mania, Storge, Eros, Ludos. Happy endings are not necessarily found but it’s charming, heartfelt and well written. A perfect beach read, a perfect cosy Sunday read, or a perfect rainy day escape.

Soaring fantasy

Title: Shadow Scale by Rachel Hartman
Publisher: Random House March 2015
587pp with glossary and list of characters, maps
Genre: YA, Science fantasy, science fiction, fantasy, sequel
5 Stars *****
Author: Rachel Hartman won several awards for her debut novel Seraphina, including the William C Morris YA Debut Award, and Cybils Award for YA Fantasy. Seraphina quickly became a best seller, indie favourite and had many starred reviews. Her world building is fantastic, her plots clever, her story intricate and the characters unique and fascinating. Her love of music shines.
Story line: this is the sequel to Seraphina, and it must be read first. Seraphina, half dragon half human, searches for other of her ilk who can help end the war in the kingdom of Goredd. After reading the concise lovely prologue which introduced the previous story, I reread it anyway, remembering her magical prose and vivid descriptions. How dragons can seem real / normal is fabulous. Nothing about this story disappointed me. I wasn’t expecting where it went, rereading and savoring just amplified my enjoyment. Once to inhale, once to savor 🙂
While Seraphina was about finding herself, Shadow Scale is about the journey, finding her place in the world, understanding herself and comprehending the choices we all make. Seraphina interacts with many people, the larger complex cast is colourful and complicates the story.
I loved the foreshadowing in both the first book and the history prologue. I liked that this wasn’t a conventional romance, but that was also not unexpected given the ending of the first book. Their relationships are more private/subtle and much appreciated. Life isn’t full of answers, perhaps we don’t even have the right questions. We don’t always have to live by the rules of others.
A wfew months have lapsed between books, although we have been granted an historical overview (read prologue carefully). I also like that this is a sequel and isn’t spawning a dozen more to anticipate. The author is returning to this fantastically created world with another pair of books, and I hope it is with some of the other notable characters. Although any story with an older Seraphina (and her Uncle) would be most welcome.
There are excellent themes on how relationships work; the greater good, motivation and choices; exploration of cultures and peoples; how maturing affects our perceptions. I enjoyed her exploration of a saint based religion, and how secret books create ignorant society.
I loved the ending. This is a brilliant captivating tale: Well told with rich settings and heartbreaking characters. I won’t forget them.
Read on:
Kirsten Cashore Graceling, Bitterblue etc
Anne McCaffrey Dragonsong
Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series, but also new Uprooted.
And look for her next books in Goredd.

Opening sentence
:
I returned to myself.
I rubbed by eyes, forgetting that the left was bruised and the pain snapped the world into focus.
Quotes:
Lars distracted him with bagpipes.
I wasn’t thirsty, but any trace of kindness in my dragon uncle was a thing to encourage.
Lars is designing new war machines.
Mud, on the other hand, is infinite.
Herself seemed a terrible place to be; I still wished I could have saved her from it.
All the trials of a day may be endured if you know there’s such a sky at the end of it.
I saw that my assumptions had blinded me…
The thing itself plus nothing equals everything.
Never beyond repair good heart.
This was going to take all my courage, and I needed a little more music to get there.

I confess I started my Netgalley copy, reverted to hardback Seraphina, discovered I had purchased an Ebook as I couldn’t wait for this (before I was approved by Netgalley), and didn’t know if I would be at a bookstore. AND actually read it as a hardback personal copy when it was placed on the shelf in Barnes and Noble a day before publication. So, I didn’t highlight many quotes, as I never mark first editions. Random pages always found a memorable quotable sentence.

Read as an ARC from NetGalley